How to get a break from caring

How to get a break from caring

It is not unreasonable to want some time to yourself. It’s important, for both of you, that you are refreshed and have regular breaks. There are a number of ways to arrange for an adult person you care for to be looked after so you can have a rest without worrying about them.  If you do not have family or friends who are willing to step in – and do accept offers if they are appropriate – here are some options. They include simple ways of being able to call for help, professional care at home, a stay in residential care, or a specialist holiday with care.

Assistive Technology

Assistive Technology

For some people, just being able to call for assistance if needed is enough. If the person you care for can use a mobile, that is an obvious solution. You could also consider an alarm pendant which connects to a call centre in case of emergency.

Find your local alarm provider.

For a greater level of monitoring, the Telecare service offers various detectors for events such as falls, smoke, flood, leaving the house and medication reminders.  This equipment is free to those who are eligible, but it is necessary to have a care needs assessment through Adult Social Care (ASC) first. 

Activities with other people

Activities with other people

You could consider local activities such as luncheon clubs, social clubs, and arts activities. These allow you to leave the person you care for, knowing someone will notice if there is a problem. Some are mainstream clubs but some might be specialist activities for people with particular needs.

Find out about lunch and social clubs on the Gloucestershire County Council Your Circle website. in Gloucestershire.

If the person you care for needs specialist day care, for example if  they are frail, or have a learning disability or dementia, you could get an Adult Social Care (ASC) care needs assessment to enable you to access specialist service.  If your loved one is assessed as needing this specialist day care, it might be funded by the council, subject to a means test.

Find out how to contact the council to request a care needs assessment for an adult. If you are a parent carer you can find out more from The Local Offer.

Carers short breaks service

Carers short breaks service

This is a service funded by the County Council to offer a few hours of replacement care in the form of either one-to-one help at home, care and support in group activities or at a day centre.

To access this service the carer must have a carers assessment in which eligible needs are identified, and then a support plan showing that the carers short breaks service is the only way in which those needs could be met. This service is free to carers who qualify for it. For more details of the Carers Assessment process see our page on Carers Assessment.

 

Domiciliary care - care at home

Domiciliary care - care at home

Home care is when a professional care worker comes to your home to support your loved one when you are not there. You can arrange this privately or find out if you are eligible for funding via a care needs assessment, through Adult Social Care.

Find your local domiciliary care agency.

Request a care needs assessment for the person being cared-for.

Residential care

Residential care

If you want to go away for a longer time, you could consider residential respite care.

You can organise this privately. Or you might be assessed as eligible for funding via a care needs assessment through adult social care.  

Find your local residential or day care facility.   

Request a care needs assessment for the person being cared-for.

Specialist holidays

Specialist holidays

A specialist holiday with care is also a possibility. You can be reassured your friend or loved one is getting appropriate support as well as enjoying a holiday on their own.

The British Institute of Learning Disability has a list of supported holidays.

Revitalise offer accessible holidays for disabled people, with or without their carer.